Dinosaur of the week: Dodo

April 22 is Earth Day. Raphus cucullatus as exhibited in Oxford’s Museum of Natural History is the unfortunate symbol of where we’re heading. The Age of Loneliness, or Eremozoic Era according to E.O. Wilson, is upon us. So I think his idea to set aside at least 50% of the Earth for non-human use only is a very good idea.

Dinosaur of the week: Common Chiffchaff

chiffchaffThe arrival of Phylloscopus collybita is always a sure sign that spring is in the air, even if the weather in Germany has been chilly for the last few days. I have to thank The Unknown Birder on the birdforum.net for helping me with the identification. Little brown birds are lovely, but not easy for a beginner-birder like me. On the bright side, I can ID this bird by its song.

Swansong to a floodplain

Yeah, I’m feeling a wee bit sentimental. We’ve left our home of three years in Bratislava, said good-bye to many a good friend (who we hope to meet again in the future), and also said bye to our favourite twitching places along the river Morava / March. And because spring had already mightily started to spring, we had some lovely sightings in the floodplain near Devinska Nova Ves like a yawning stork, circling white-tailed eagle or a hare:

We also went to the WWF nature reserve -just over the border in Austria- in Marchegg, to see more storks and other birds:

I was particularly happy to have seen the breeding herons again. On top of that, I had never knowingly seen gadwalls before, so that was a rather welcome sight too.

Of course, there was some non-avian activity. The frogs and toads were mating, and snakes were around to hunt the mating amphibians.

Yep, it’s sad to leave such places, but there’s also the fact that we take some¬†wonderful memories with us. Plus, there’s the chance to explore something new.

Dinosaur of the week: Red-breasted Parakeet

While on holiday in Cambodia a few years ago, we spent two weeks in Siem Reap to explore Angkor Wat and surrounding temples. In Ta Prohm, we saw these Psittacula alexandri, soaring over the highest trees, and very rarely coming close enough to take a photo of with a compact camera.