Dinosaur of the week: Spotted Flycatcher

spotted flycatcher

Our local patch of forest and shrubs is also home to Muscicapa striata. According to the IUCN the species is threatened by biocide-induced reductions or contamination of insect populations, removal of old trees and general habitat deterioration.

Dinosaur of the week: Common Linnet

linnet

This Linaria cannabina was perching in the dunes of Dunkirk in France. The species is in decline because of ‘the intensification of agriculture, resulting in destruction of hedgerows, improved harvesting of cereals, and the eradication of fallow and weedy fields through application of herbicides‘.

The bird is also commonly mentioned in popular culture, e.g. mentioned by Charles Dickens or Oscar Wilde. Thanks to the people on birdforum.net for their help with the ID.

Dinosaur of the week: Garganey

garganey

It was a few years ago on Loch Morlich in Scotland where I encountered what I think is a female Spatula querquedula. The species is listed as least concern on the Red List, but numbers are in decline and threats are aplenty:

  • habitat deterioration and destruction (dam building, irrigation)
  • destruction of nests through meadow mowing
  • lead poisoning
  • hunting (eg in France)

Dinosaur of the week: Grey Heron

grey heron

I find Ardea cinerea fascinating. If you’ve ever watched one hunting you might understand why. This particular bird was finding food on the outskirts of Oxford.

On the other hand, their hunting skills are why the birds are persecuted in some areas. Another danger to them is the cutting of trees because they build their nests high up and they nest in colonies, so many birds are affected.