Dinosaur of the week: Common Chiffchaff

chiffchaffThe arrival of Phylloscopus collybita is always a sure sign that spring is in the air, even if the weather in Germany has been chilly for the last few days. I have to thank The Unknown Birder on the birdforum.net for helping me with the identification. Little brown birds are lovely, but not easy for a beginner-birder like me. On the bright side, I can ID this bird by its song.

Swansong to a floodplain

Yeah, I’m feeling a wee bit sentimental. We’ve left our home of three years in Bratislava, said good-bye to many a good friend (who we hope to meet again in the future), and also said bye to our favourite twitching places along the river Morava / March. And because spring had already mightily started to spring, we had some lovely sightings in the floodplain near Devinska Nova Ves like a yawning stork, circling white-tailed eagle or a hare:

We also went to the WWF nature reserve -just over the border in Austria- in Marchegg, to see more storks and other birds:

I was particularly happy to have seen the breeding herons again. On top of that, I had never knowingly seen gadwalls before, so that was a rather welcome sight too.

Of course, there was some non-avian activity. The frogs and toads were mating, and snakes were around to hunt the mating amphibians.

Yep, it’s sad to leave such places, but there’s also the fact that we take some¬†wonderful memories with us. Plus, there’s the chance to explore something new.

Dinosaur of the week: Cape Starling

cape-starlingThis Lamprotornis nitens was a curious little fellow in Hlane National Park, Swaziland. It’s also called a red-shouldered glossy-starling or Cape glossy starling. At first, I confused this species with Burchell’s Starling, but they have brown eyes, not yellow ones.

Apparently, the Cape Starling is able to see in the UV-spectrum and can therefore recognize different grades of ripeness of fruit.

Dinosaur of the week: Rufus-collared Sparrow

rufus-collared-sparrowIt’s a slightly odd picture of a Zonotrichia capensis, but unfortunately I didn’t have much time. When we were in Tierra del Fuego, we only spent a few minutes at a lovely lake bordering Argentina and Chile in the National Park near Ushuaia. So I’m very glad I saw at least the sparrow’s back.