Oran – National Museum Ahmed Zabana

It’s quite a title for a museum that has a vast area available to display its exhibits. Ahmed Zabana is of local and national importance (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmed_Zabana). I think it’s his photo hanging in the entrance hall. entranceInside the museum, photography is not allowed. Hence there won’t be any pics of all the bones, stuffed animals (including a goat embryo with a double head), swords, painted landscapes, clothes or pottery. You see, the collection is holistic rather than specialised.

On the whole, I think the way the exhibits are presented leaves a lot to be desired. There’s a name, sometimes a year and place of origin. For animals, the Latin name of the species is given. Other than that, next to no context. So not as informative as it could be, and also a bit dull. Having said that, I realise that keeping such a vast and diverse collection must put an enormous strain on the curators even just in terms of day-to-day house keeping. And I also appreciate that all labels are in Arabic as well as French.

My favourite object was a 20th-century bamboo stick from New Caledonia. I guess that’s a reminder of French colonialism – how else would the stick have ended up in Oran? Anyway, it was beautifully and intricately carved with animals like cats and humans.

On the outside, the museum looks very different again. The murals seem to commemorate Algeria’s distant past during Numidian or Roman times. Judge for yourself:

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WorldBookProject – Revolution, Archaeology and Pain

First of all, August is coming – and August is #WITmonth. That’s #womenintranslation for the uninitiated, and I’m planning to participate and to read translated books by female authors. Of course, I’ll try to choose books from places which #WorldBookProject hasn’t covered yet.

On matters closer at hand, this post deals with more books from or about dependent territories and issues stemming from colonialism. Since I’m probably not the only one who is mildly geographically challenged, here’s the quick explainer: the Cocos Islands are a territory of Australia in the Indian Ocean, Guam is a territory of the USA in the Pacific Ocean, and the Republic of Guinea is a West-African country and not to be confused with Guinea-Bisseau or Equatorial Guinea.

138  Cocos (Keeling) Islands: Pat Linford – The Coconut Revolution

I found this book a typical self-published oddity. It dealt with the author and her husband’s experience during the transfer of the islands from a British colonial system to Australia. The self-proclaimed king and his dynasty of Scottish-Malay ancestry, the family Clunies-Ross, featured heavily. There were lots of typos and grammatical errors which took the joy out of reading.

139 Guam: Mike T. Carson – Guam’s hidden gem: archaeological and historical studies at Ritidian

Yes, this was a gem. Imagine you’re the poor sod who has to shift excavated soil from 77 holes, each at least 1m³, through a 1mm mesh. Reading academic articles can actually be fascinating (or a bit masochistic) when you come to the methodology. I learned about Near and Remote Oceania, the brutal deaths of missionaries and how the archaeologists work together with environmental agencies to protect the Guam National Wildlife Refuge.

140 Guinea: Tierno Monénembo – The Bush Toads

This is in all likelihood one of the most depressing books I’ve ever read, but it’s also very well crafted. The pain, anger, fear and hate the characters felt came truly to live. That made it also rather difficult to read, but then I didn’t set out to read around the world to make life easier. It’s definitely an author I’d love to explore further (this was his first book, published almost 40 years ago), and if you want to read it – there’s a ray of sunshine at the end.

WorldBookProject – Yet more island cruising

WorldBookProject is still visiting some overseas territories, dependencies and territories which are claimed or contested. A lot of these places are not permanently inhabited, but provide space for a research station or a military outpost. In other territories the number of inhabitants is so small that nobody has as yet put pen to paper or finger to keyboard and written a book. That’s the reason why many of the books I’ve read to represent these places were written by authors from somewhere else.

133 Bouvet Island:  Geoffrey Jenkins –  A Grue of Ice

This felt a bit like James Bond goes Antarctica. The characters were clear-cut into good guys and baddies and thus utterly boring. However, the scenery provided by icebergs and glaciers was stunning, I had a chance to brush up on inorganic chemistry in a fun way, and there were some pretty good action scenes.

134 Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: Alice Joseph and Veronica F. Murray – Chamorros and Carolinians of Saipan: Personality Studies

At the beginning of the 1950s, the two authors wrote up their psychological explorations of the people of Saipan. If you’re interested in Rorschach, Bender gestalt or IQ tests, this book is for you. I have to admit that I find all this a bit dodgy, but then I’m not a psychologist. For me, it was most interesting to learn that the islands were under German occupation at the beginning of the 20th century. Compared to the Spanish rule before and the Japanese and American after, people told the authors that they were pining for the good old days under the Kaiser.

135 Jan Mayen: Johannes Lid and Dagny Tande Lid – The flora of Jan Mayen

20 years ago, when I had just failed abysmally badly in a botany exam at uni who would have thought that one day I would read a book about botany? Certainly not me. However, going down memory lane with this piece of writing was quite fun. Most impressive however, was the author’s determination not to translate any of the quotes he used in the text. Hence, this book came in English, German, French, Latin, and Norwegian. I dealt more or less successfully with four of the languages, but had to give up on the Latin parts.

136 Overseas Collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon: William F. Rannie  – Saint Pierre and Miquelon

This was a very good overview of what is a group of islands near Canada, but actually part of France proper. Most interesting fact: During Prohibition, the islands were THE hub for liquor trade or smuggling, depending on your perspective.

137 Territory of Christmas Island: Margaret Neale – We were the Christmas Islanders

The author collected people’s memories of living on the island, which was usually only a few years. People from China or Malaysia would work in phosphate mining, white people (usually British) ruled. After the island became Australian, things changed extremely slowly, while racism and discrimination were rife. The silver lining: the annual crab migration.